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Vaccination required. Click to read about Health and Safety Guidelines for your visit

Protecting audiences and actors

We are taking the following steps to support safe attendance for artists, staff and audience during your visit.

  • Everyone (including audience members) at Theater Wit is required to be vaccincated to enter the building.
    • To comply with union health and safety guidelienes, each audience member must show proof of vaccination at the door for admittance.
    • Please present your vaccination card (electronic photos and copies are acceptable). Only fully vaccinated members of the public may be admitted. Negative PCR and rapid test results are not valid for admittance.
    • Patrons with medical or religious exemptions may be admitted but must contact the box office a minimum of 48 hours before the performance for additional review and guidance. Masks are required for medical and religious exemptions.
    • If you forget proof of vaccination, we will reschedule your tickets at no charge.
  • Free Exchanges due to illness
    • If you are feeling unwell, please do not attend :)
    • Contact our box office on the day of performance and we will reschedule your ticket at no charge.
  • Please note that masking is required at some performances for patrons with health concerns. Please check your ticket confirmation to verify policy for your performance.
  • Our upgraded HVAC systems increase the number of air exchanges to remove aerosolized droplets and provide updated filtering to meet CDC and city standards.
  • On behalf of the producers, staff and performers, we issue a heartfelt thank you to our audiences who make these generous accomodations for the health of all.

Figaro copy

Conducted by Codrut Birsan Directed by Margaret Jumonville
Theater Three
Chicago Summer Opera
Visiting Company

The Marriage of Figaro (Le nozze di Figaro) is set in Count Almaviva’s castle in Seville in the late 18th Century. It is based on Beaumarchais’s 1784 play La Folle Journée, ou Le Mariage de Figaro, a sequel to his earlier play, Le Barbier de Séville (The Barber of Seville), familiar to opera audiences through Rossini’s great opera (Mozart’s opera premiered in 1786; Rossini’s premiered in 1816). In Le Barbier, Count Almaviva, with substantial help from Figaro, wooed and won the lovely Rosine away from her crusty old ward and would-be husband, Dr. Bartholo. In The Marriage of Figaro, Beaumarchais continued their story. The Count has married Rosine but their marriage has gone sour because of his philandering. Figaro has quit barbering and is now the Count’s major-domo. He is engaged to Suzanne, who is Countess Rosine’s maid — and the Count’s intended conquest. Old Bartholo is back to seek revenge on Figaro for taking Rosine away from him, with the help of the slimy music-master, Don Bazile. Adding to the fun are an amorous teenager, a scheming old maid, a drunken gardener, and a silly young girl. Much happens on a single “folle journée” — a crazy day. Mozart’s librettist, Lorenzo da Ponte, took this popular play, removed “political” content that would have offended the Viennese imperial censors (the French Revolution was only a few years away), and faithfully translated the rest into Italian — the customary opera language of the day. With Mozart’s masterpiece of a score, the result was a witty yet profound tale of love, betrayal, and forgiveness.

Running Time: 3 hours with intermission


This event has no performances available for sale.

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